Social Care As A Human Rights and Equality Issue

Baroness Jane Campbell has called for Personalisation and Social Care to been seen as a human rights and equality issue. In a powerful speech to the Institute for Public Policy Research, she says that funding for older people, support for carers, and promoting independent living needs to be one debate.

Echoing CSCI’s recent report on social care, Baroness Campbell questioned the tightening of eligibility criteria by local authorities – ‘If disabled people cannot access services unless they have the highest level of need, then all the empowering transformed delivery in the world, will not change the inequality experienced by people and families who require public service support to participate equally in society.’ 

She added ‘When we debate the future of adult social care, we are talking about people’s human rights and equality, not just for the person requiring the support, but for those with whom they share their lives.’

Here at SCIL, we believe Self Directed Support can only be fully utilised if people receive support and advocacy in order to make informed decisions.

Jane seems to agree. She said ‘As Demos have pointed out, the very advantages that personalisation and coproduction potentially offers also contain the seeds of building further inequality and disadvantage: “there will be huge scope for self-directed services and personal budgets. These pay-offs will particularly apply where people can mobilise their own knowledge and resources to make the service more effective”.  “For those who do not — the most excluded in our society, the people who need it the most, will lose out”.

We highly recommend blog visitors read the complete speech on the Equality and Human Rights Commission Website.

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